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Category: Healthcare



  • Market-Based Medicine Beats Grim Prognosis

    Ross Marchand on April 11, 2019

    woman standing next to woman riding wheelchair
    This article originally appeared in the Catalyst on April 2, 2019.


    For nearly a decade, the American public, insurers, and taxpayers have gotten used to hearing bad news about the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”) and have personally felt its effects. Premiums were rising, networks were narrowing, plans were being cancelled, and insurers were dropping out as then-President Obama assured the public that more Americans would soon be insured. But now, thanks in large part to Trump administration reforms, there’s finally a stable marketplace with falling prices. And now that the Department of Justice has announced it will no longer defend the law’s constitutionality, Obamacare’s final demise may not be far off.  The administration and Congress have a historic opportunity to enact more market-oriented reforms that can cover more people at a lower cost to taxpayers and consumers. » Read More
  • 'Reference Pricing' Would be Bitter Pill for Millions of Patients to Swallow

    Ross Marchand on April 1, 2019

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    This article was originally published in RealClearPolicy on April 1, 2019. 

    With enough research, development, and vision, a speculative “dream cure” for a terrible disease can turn into an obtainable reality for millions of patients. But unfortunately, sometimes government policy gets in the way of promising cures. In October 2018, the Department of Health and Human Services proposed a devastating rule that would tether Medicare Part B drugs to a rigid pricing structure modeled after European single-payer healthcare systems. » Read More
  • Free Market Groups Unite Against Healthcare Price Controls

    Grace Morgan on March 28, 2019


    TPA joined together with free-market groups to explain why the proposed International Pricing Index (IPI) for Medicare Part B drugs will harm taxpayers and chill innovation.
    » Read More
  • War on Cancer Progress Depends on Market Innovation

    Ross Marchand on March 26, 2019

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    This article was originally published in the Catalyst on March 23, 2019. 

    In 1971, President Richard Nixon declared war on an unconventional foe: cancer. Like the other war that was being waged at the time, policymakers had both some good but also many flawed ideas about how to beat the enemy. Thankfully, with the war on cancer, many of the good ideas won out and significant progress has been achieved in these past 48 years—owing primarily to the unleashing of market forces in developing game-changing cures. Now, as President Trump pledges to double down on cancer research funding, the chief executive, his administration, and Congress could stand to learn a thing or two about what has gone right—and wrong—during our nearly-fifty year tussle with this bitter and relentless foe. » Read More
  • Precision Medicine Needs Research Dollars, Not Price-Fixing

    Ross Marchand on March 18, 2019

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  • Coalition Support for Cell and Gene Replacement Therapy

    Grace Morgan on March 7, 2019

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    Today, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) along with fifteen additional free-market organizations sent a letter to Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Azar in support of transformative healthcare opportunities on the horizon, including cell and gene therapies. 
    » Read More
  • Greater Ambulance Flexibility Can Save Lives and Dollars

    Ross Marchand on February 27, 2019

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    This article originally appeared in Catalyst on February 25, 2019. 

    When a patient finds themselves in the back of an ambulance, there’s little question of the final destination. While emergency rooms (ERs) are ideal for potentially-fatal ailments such as heart attacks and gunshot wounds, the over-reliance on ERs for more minor issues diverts key dollars and personnel away from where they are needed. According to an IBM Watson study, nearly a quarter of patients in the ER didn’t, in fact, require medical attention, and more than 40 percent required care that could have been carried out in a primary care setting. » Read More
  • Gene Replacement Can be the Cure that Patients—and Taxpayers—Have Been Looking For

    Ross Marchand on February 21, 2019

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    This article originally appeared in the Catalyst on February 15, 2019. 

    “Preventative medicine” is a great idea, except for the small caveat that the concept has saved few lives at a substantial cost. For example, according to researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health and Tufts–New England Medical Center, screening all 65-year-olds for diabetes (as opposed to screening only 65-year-olds with hypertension for diabetes) costs hundreds of thousands of dollars for each year of life saved. But what if a one-time shot early in life could prevent diseases such as diabetes altogether, saving countless lives and health care dollars? Fortunately, a new line of treatment—gene replacement therapy—offers the game-changing benefits to patients that doctors could only dream of a decade ago. And, this new technology could save taxpayers billions of dollars. » Read More
  • Genetics-Based Medicine can Save Millions of Lives and Billions of Dollars

    Ross Marchand on February 5, 2019

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    This article originally appeared in the Catalyst on January 31, 2019.

    Anyone who has had a bacterial infection can attest to the misery of being bedridden and the frustration of taking medications that sometimes do not work. Why some drugs work and some don’t has been a mystery since the advent of modern medicine a century ago, but new advances in medical research show strong links between genetic variation and drug responses. » Read More
  • Native Americans Deserve Better Than Socialized Medicine

    Ross Marchand on January 14, 2019

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    This article originally appeared in the Catalyst on January 3, 2018.


    The results are in, argues The Center for Public Integrity’s Wendell Potter: America’s healthcare system underperforms due to “the belief that the free market…can work as well in health care as it can in other sectors of the economy.” Don’t tell that to the more than 2 million Native Americans who receive their medical care through a federal service known as the Indian Health Service (IHS).

    » Read More
  • Healthcare pricing mandates are no substitute for shopping around

    Ross Marchand on January 10, 2019

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    This article originally appeared in the Washington Examiner on January 7, 2019. 

    It's easy to pay without thinking twice. On trips to the supermarket, consumers can see the price of any product and decide whether or not to buy accordingly, forcing sellers to keep costs as low as possible. A consumer who wouldn’t think much of a $2 price tag for a dozen eggs wouldn’t buy the same product for $20.  But if that same customer had someone else’s credit card, and no credit limit, then what does it matter if eggs are $2 or $20 a dozen? Sadly, that’s how markets work right now in the medical sector, where the government and third-party insurers are the primary payers and individuals have no incentive to shop around. » Read More
  • Why I Care About Harm Reduction

    David Williams on January 7, 2019

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    This article originally appeared on Inside Sources on January 6, 2019.

    As president of the Taxpayers Protection Alliance, I don’t usually write about policy from a personal perspective (even though I am a taxpayer). Over the past two years, TPA has written extensively about the Food and Drug Administration and its unique position to approve harm reduction products that help people switch from traditional cigarettes to reduced-risk products, such as vaping and heat-not-burn products like IQOS. » Read More
  • Mandated Listing of Pharmaceutical Prices Would Worsen American Healthcare Crisis

    Ross Marchand on October 25, 2018


    Congress has faced the same question about what can be done about high drug prices for decades. Recent policies, such as lowering regulatory barriers to drug approval, have already yielded results and begun to lower prices. Other ideas, such as expanding the use of tax-free savings accounts and reducing insurer mandates, hold additional promise for injecting market forces into the American healthcare system to bring down costs. 

    » Read More
  • The FDA Must Avoid Policies that Would Inflame the Opioid Crisis

    Ross Marchand on September 17, 2018


    Last week, the Independent Women’s Forum (IWF) convened an expert discussion panel on the opioid crisis with Jessica Hulsey Nickel (the President & Chief Executive Officer of the Addiction Policy Forum), and  Charmaine Yoest (Associate Director at the Office of National Drug Control Policy) in the Executive Office of the President. Both Nickel and Yoest shared poignant stories about the epidemic which has claimed more than 200,000 lives over the past 20 years. Both experts agreed that a comprehensive government approach is needed to ensure that the crisis of opioid addiction and abuse is addressed without limiting access to those with legitimate needs for medications. The conversation underscored the dire seriousness of the situation, but also provided real insight into how the private and non-profit sectors can and are working with government to help end the crisis and get those affected the care and support that they need.

    » Read More
  • Patents and Intellectual Property: Essential for Competition and Global Health

    Ross Marchand on August 21, 2018

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    For more than a century, the United States has consistently led the world in technological development. From automobiles to iPhones, America has helped to create new industries and raise the standard of living worldwide. But game-changing developments in medicine, communication, and transportation wouldn’t be possible without assurances that inventors would benefit from their contributions. The driving force in promoting innovation is protecting intellectual property (IP) through thorough patent, copyright, and trademark enforcement. 

    » Read More
  • Accountability is Coming to 340B – Better Late Than Never

    Ross Marchand on August 7, 2018


    On August 1, the House Energy and Commerce Committee sent letters to the CEOs of nine contract pharmacies that participate in the 340B Drug Pricing Program. The letters, which bring attention to the “diversion and duplicate discounts” and lack of oversight by covered entities, are a powerful reminder that the program is failing to live up to its promise. As the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) has previously discussed in blog pieces, letters, statements, and social media, the 340B Program has morphed into a paradigm for government waste and is in desperate need of reform. » Read More
  • Mandating List Prices on Advertisements Won’t Bring Down Drug Prices

    Ross Marchand on July 27, 2018


    President Trump has made his campaign promise to lower the cost of healthcare and drug prices a high priority for his administration. His proposal and his policies have already yielded results.  And, the implementation of many of his other ideas hold promise in injecting market forces into the American healthcare system to bring down costs. Not all administration proposals are created equally, though; one proposal in particular would prove counterproductive in bringing down prices despite hype by some “reform” advocates. Sen. Richard Durbin (D-IL) has introduced an amendment into an appropriations bill that would force drug manufacturers to include the list price of a drug in any advertisement.

    » Read More
  • Medicare Part D Reforms Needed to Keep Costs Low for Taxpayers and Seniors

    Ross Marchand on May 30, 2018

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    When paying for healthcare, American seniors often have a difficult time navigating through the benefit structures and limitations of Medicare. While Medicare Part D registers astronomical approval ratings from seniors, there is a large cost problem. Drugs accessible to seniors face rampant cost escalation, forcing individuals on a fixed income to make difficult choices in financing their medical needs.  And, taxpayers pay the increased costs through public health plans. Attempted reforms to save seniors and taxpayers from unintended costs have proven futile  and must be reversed to bring sanity back to the system. » Read More
  • President Trump’s Healthcare Plan is Already Bringing Down Drug Prices

    David Williams on May 23, 2018

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    President Trump’s focus on drug prices is already paying off. Almost immediately following the President’s speech on drug pricing, pharmaceutical manufacturer Amgen announced that their new treatment for migraines will cost 30 percent less than analysts anticipated.  This is good news for patients and taxpayers who foot the bill for these medications via government healthcare plans. » Read More
  • TPA Criticizes Proposals for Heavy-Handed Drug Regulations

    David Williams on May 10, 2018

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    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) criticized proposals by leading Congressional Democrats to create a drug price “enforcer” ahead of the President’s speech on the issue Friday.  Party leaders such as House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D- Calif.), and Senate Minority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D- N.Y.) have sought to highlight rising pharmaceutical prices under the Trump Administration and propose heavy-handed alternatives to the status-quo. » Read More
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