BREAKING: TPA and CFIF Release Findings from Poll on Border Adjustment Tax

Michi Iljazi

March 29, 2017

Today, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) and the Center for Individual Freedom (CFIF) released findings from a new poll conducted to find out how the public viewed the Border Adjustment Tax (BAT), priorities for tax reform, and components of what may be included in upcoming legislation from Congress.  

Leaders of both organizations reacted to the findings:

“TPA has been sounding the alarm over the BAT for months, and it’s clear from this survey that taxpayers are just as concerned as we are. Tax reform is critical, and Congress needs to put forth a plan that works for everyone. There’s a better way on tax reform, and that’s by focusing on how to reduce the size of government and cut spending, not raising taxes somewhere else.” –David Williams, President, Taxpayers Protection Alliance

“The American people recognize the BAT for exactly what it is: a trillion dollar plus effective tax on gasoline, clothing and virtually all other essential products purchased by consumers on a daily basis. Tax reform is an absolute must, but a disruptive BAT threatens not only jobs, but tax reform’s passage.  Congress should instead focus on measures that reduce spending and promote economic growth.”–Jeff Mazzella, President, Center for Individual Freedom

Here are some of the key findings:

  • Despite general support for exports and manufacturing, there is limited enthusiasm among consumers for paying more for goods to encourage those things.  
  • When asked how much they would be willing to pay each year to make American companies more economically competitive, the median response was just 10 dollars; 42 percent are unwilling to pay more than 5 dollars.
  • There’s clarity among respondents that the border adjustment will raise prices.
  • When asked, just 41 percent thought it was likely that the proposal will be good for consumers because businesses will pass along those savings to them.
  • Voters are concerned about the misdirected focus of tax reform.  More than 3 in 4 (62 percent in national topline, 65 percent among Republicans) said the focus should be on economic growth rather than offsetting tax changes with increases.
  • A clear majority of voters prefer tax cuts to be accompanied by reductions in federal spending rather than increases in other taxes.  Just 18 percent indicated they favored the current approach of offsetting tax increases; 72 percent (82 percent among Republicans) said they favored cuts in federal spending.
  • Trust in Congress is limited. Just 29 percent of voters said they trusted Congress to pass the legislation in a way that helps consumers; 63 percent said they did not trust Congress to do that.  Among Republicans, 67 percent trust President Trump more than Congress on tax reform; only 11 percent trust Congress more.

The poll was conducted with a nationwide sample of 1001 likely voters (margin of error, 3.1 percent) with an additional oversample of 200 likely Republican voters.

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