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Category: Regulation



  • Alabama taxpayers could save money and have faster internet based on technology being tested in Cullman

    Johnny Kampis on December 13, 2017

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    This article originally appeared on Yellowhammer News on December 10, 2017

    Nestled between knee-high grass and mobile homes, a cell tower in this small community in Cullman County will soon demonstrate cutting-edge technology. It is here that AT&T will run fiber-optic cable and then beam internet signals to nearby homes with antennas installed on their rooftops, a service known as fixed wireless. This rural area in Alabama is one of the test cases for the new technology, which AT&T will use to deliver internet to areas where it’s not cost effective to build out fiber-optic infrastructure.

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  • America's Two-Tiered Economy Undermines Small Businesses

    Ross Marchand on October 17, 2017


    This article appeared in The Hill on September 27, 2017. 

    America has an inequality problem, but not the one many people think. Every few years, statisticians armed with the latest income data from the U.S. Census Bureau claim to find ever-increasing evidence of a widening gap between the have and have-nots. Economists on the right side of the political aisle (and affiliated think tanks) quibble with the methodology used by these researchers, but the overall evidence seems to point to a large gap of some sort. Debating exactly how large this gap is, though, is not nearly as important as trying to make sense of it.

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  • To Benefit from Regulatory Reform, Georgia Must Revamp Judiciary

    Ross Marchand on October 13, 2017


    This is the second of a two-part series on public policy in the Republic of Georgia. On Friday, Taxpayers Protection Alliance policy analyst Ross Marchand  addressed the International Black Sea University in Tbilisi on economic reform in Georgia and the United States. Since the dissolution of the Soviet Union in 1991, Georgia has transformed into an economic juggernaut hell-bent on reversing communist controls. Reform efforts reached a zenith in the early 2000s with passage of comprehensive deregulatory initiatives that made it easier for businesses to expand and hire in the Caucasus nation. For the first time, Georgian lawmakers allowed workers to work overtime hours, and permitted employees to negotiate the number of hours worked per week with their employers. Additionally, employers would be permitted to fire individuals without the stated permission of their trade union.

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  • TPA Applauds Decision by President Trump to Withdrawal from Paris Climate Deal

    Michi Iljazi on June 2, 2017

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    Washington, D.C.- Today, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) reacted to the news that President Trump would proceed with withdrawing the United States from the Paris Climate Agreement entered into by the Obama Administration in 2015. After heavy public, and private, debate with stakeholders and administration officials, the White House announced today that the U.S. would no longer be a part of the regulatory framework. 

    Click "Read Blog" below to see the full statement

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  • TPA and TechFreedom Lead Coalition Urging FDA to Embrace Innovation

    Michi Iljazi on June 1, 2017

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    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been operating inefficiently for many years, stifling innovation and making questionable decisions on agency process as it relates to the core functions of the FDA. A change in leadership is exactly what is needed, and newly confirmed FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb could have a strong impact on making the positive changes needed in order to foster innovation and progress in many sectors where the FDA plays a meaningful role. That is why TPA joined with TechFreedom to send this coalition letter to the FDA, Health and Human Services (HHS), Office of Management and Budget (OMB), and the White House calling on Dr. Gottlieb to bring the focus of the agency back to innovation and technology when evaluating solutions and processes at the FDA.

    Click "Read Blog" below to see the full letter.

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  • TPA Call to Action in Support of Repealing Title II Internet Regulations

    David Williams on May 24, 2017

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    WASHINGTON, D.C. – On Thursday, May 18 Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai took a very important step to undo the regulatory damage left behind by President Obama and former FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. The Title II rules implemented by Obama and Wheeler gave control of the Internet to unaccountable government bureaucrats, and threatened to increase taxes and slow investment and growth in this important industry. It is clear that Chairman Pai is serious about getting tech policy accomplished in a way that works best for taxpayers and all Americans. A free and open Internet will foster continued investment in broadband infrastructure, greater consumer choice, and an open marketplace without putting taxpayers at risk. These rules have cost taxpayers, slowed down broadband infrastructure investment, and hindered competition and choice for Americans. The time to remove the regulatory stranglehold on the internet is NOW. TPA is encouraging all of our members to submit a comment TODAY (click here), and tell Chaiman Pai that you support a free and open Internet.

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  • TPA Thanks FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s for Thursday’s Crucial Vote on Title II

    Michi Iljazi on May 18, 2017

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    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Today, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) applauded Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai for taking very important steps to undo the regulatory damage done by ex-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler.  The vote today to do away with Wheeler’s disastrous Title II regulations imposed on the internet show that the agency, under the new leadership of Chairman Pai, is serious about getting tech policy accomplished in a way that works best for all Americans. TPA President David Williams released the following statement about today’s open meeting.

    Click "Read Blog" below to see the full statement

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  • Bill Nye's Selective 'Scientific' Worldview is a Hot Mess

    Ross Marchand on May 15, 2017

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    This article originally appeared in The Washington Examiner on May 9, 2017

    Bill Nye's new show on Netflix allows viewers to bask in all of the self-righteousness and goofy shouting that we missed from the 1990s. "Does the guy always shout this much?" asked an incredulous Redditor after seeing the Science Guy's show for the first time. Such questions, which have proliferated around the Web in recent days, show a fundamental disconnect between the "I love science" crowd and the rest of us. It's not that I'm trying to be "anti-intellectual"; I find the scientific method useful in tackling life's most pressing questions. But when propagandists such as Nye invoke "science" to the limited end of promoting dubious public policy, it's important that taxpayers know the truth.

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  • Online Gaming Decisions Should be Left To States, Not D.C. Bureaucrats

    David Williams on May 12, 2017

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    This article appeared in The Daily Caller on May 9, 2017

    In a meeting last week, Nevada Governor Brian Sandoval asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to leave his state alone when it comes to regulating online gaming. We don’t know the entire contents of that meeting, but Gov. Sandoval likely pointed out that Nevada and several other states are already effectively regulating online gaming. They are doing so on issues ranging from prevention of play by minors to geolocation to ID verification. To use that old chestnut, this is a problem that ain’t broke, but the federal government is looking to fix it. Politicians, encouraged by deep-pocketed patrons such as casino magnate Sheldon Adelson who don’t appreciate the online competition, are pushing a deeply flawed, dishonest piece of legislation called the Restore America’s Wire Act (RAWA). The legislation is flawed because it would lead to a crackdown of online gambling by Sessions and other law enforcement for no good reason. Americans by and large are OK with legal gambling as long as it is reasonably regulated. Online gambling hosted in states that allow it is hardly the Wild West.

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  • By Passing the Financial CHOICE Act, Congress Can Finally Put Regulators on a Tight Leash

    Ross Marchand on May 9, 2017

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    Despite the deregulatory zeal shown by the Trump Administration and Congress, the vast majority of Obama-era rules remain in place. The cumulative effect of these interventions is large, with hundreds of billions of dollars being sucked out of the economy annually. Financial regulations, ushered in under the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act, had a particularly deleterious impact by targeting lending and borrowing activities. The wide-reaching legislation costs the economy as much as $36 billion a year, and imposes 73 million paperwork hours on American firms. But what can remedy this regulatory hangover? Later this month, Congress will contemplate passage of the Financial CHOICE Act. This legislation removes the onerous mandates of the Dodd-Frank Act, and places regulators on a tight leash. Independent rule-making bodies such as the Federal Reserve and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) will now be required to comprehensively explain their cost-benefit logic to the American public. Congress already requires that new rules deemed to be economically “significant” be exhaustively evaluated in regulatory impact analyses, but financial regulations often slide under the radar. Given the ability of the Federal Reserve and the CFPB to usher in regulations affecting lending and borrowing for the entire economy, it’s only wise to require their methodologies to be scrutinized in the public eye.

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  • President Trump Should Keep Promise and Kick Paris Agreement to Curbside

    Ross Marchand on May 3, 2017

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    Fresh off his first deregulatory bout, President Trump may be aiming his firepower at the Paris Agreement next. The President pledged on the campaign trail to withdraw from the pact, and will further contemplate withdrawal over the next two weeks. In the meantime, lawmakers and pundits have rushed to the defense of the Obama-era agreement to clamp down on global carbon emissions. On the surface, the accord’s insistence that each nation do their fair share to reduce carbon emissions seems like a reasonable approach to tackle climate change. But despite the Paris Agreement’s lofty goals, the agreed-upon mechanisms in the agreement will harm nations rich and poor. While the agreed-upon reductions reached in the negotiations are nowhere near sufficient to reach the goal of zero net emissions by 2050, provisions ensure that countries will continue to up the ante on emission reductions. Every five years, nations are expected to “ratchet up” their rate of carbon reductions via more and more aggressive governmental actions. China’s announced cap-and-trade program and India’s large-scale solar deployments show just two approaches that signatories are willing to take to meet these reduction goals. This may all seem like a laudable “moonshot,” but advocates of continued involvement are ignoring the taxpayer and opportunity costs that come with a continued worldwide agreement. 

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  • TPA Applauds FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s Vision for a Truly Open Internet

    Michi Iljazi on April 28, 2017

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    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Yesterday, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) commended Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai on presenting his plans to undo the terrible regulatory burdens ex-FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler imposed on the internet.  The proposal to rescind Wheeler’s Internet Conduct Standards and repeal Title II regulations imposed on the internet are exactly what is needed in order to once again encourage investment in broadband infrastructure and ensure an open internet with more competition and choice for all Americans.  

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  • TPA Gives President Trump His First 100 Days Report Card

    Ross Marchand on April 26, 2017

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    As President Trump marks his 100th day in office, commentators are already busy sizing up the leader’s legacy. The President’s short time in the Oval Office has been greeted with a constant stream of protests, cries for impeachment, and bouts of reflexive praise. Despite attempts to characterize the presidency in one word or phrase, the Mr. Trump’s performance has been wildly uneven. With a government shutdown looming around the same time as this milestone takes place, the stakes have become that much higher for the President to appear as though he is on or ahead of schedule with the laundry list of policy priorities he had coming into office. To highlight the positives and underscore the need for further improvement, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) has graded the chief executive on his approach to regulation, tax reform, and spending.

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  • Pai and Ohlhausen Lead FCC and FTC’s Fight Against Misguided Rules

    Ross Marchand on April 21, 2017

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    When it comes to “sensibly managing markets”, regulatory agencies talk a big game but deliver preciously little. A heap of regulations passed over the past decade were said to make marketplaces a less threatening environment for shoppers and startups, with more competition and less monopolistic behavior. In reality, bureaucrats overstated “market failures” to justify putting rules in place that exacerbated problems and created unintended consequences. But thanks to a new Administration and Congress, public servants skeptical of these destructive regulations are emboldened and taking the fight to unnecessary rules. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai and Federal Trade Commission (FTC) Chairwoman Maureen Ohlhausen are two of these figures, successfully leading the fight to deregulate and return control to market players closest to the action. The pair successfully advocated for the repeal of a “digital privacy” regulation that would’ve entrusted consumers’ browsing history to bureaucrats with a poor cybersecurity track record.

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  • Technological Innovation Is Making Your Eye Care Cheaper - But Big Medical Lobbyists Are Fighting It

    David Williams on April 20, 2017

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    This article originally appeared in IJ Review on April 13, 2017

    Technology that slashes costs for healthcare is good for consumers and taxpayers alike. There are those who don’t want to see these new technologies flourish, but, thankfully, these forces of negativity are losing the battle of bringing new technologies into the market. Just like with the disruptive technologies that have helped Uber and Airbnb become household names, tele-health and tele-medicine are disrupting the cartel that forces consumers to pay inflated prices and suffer the inconvenience of travel and time at the optometrist's office to get a prescription for eyeglasses and contact lenses. With the click of a few keys on a computer or smartphone, consumers can receive their prescriptions (signed off by an eye doctor) from the comfort of their own homes. Thanks to this technology, healthy adults only have to go to the eye doctor’s office once every two years for an eye health exam as opposed to once every time a new prescription is needed - unless the medical lobby’s intense influence campaign is successful.

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  • Don’t Let Bureaucrats Get Between You and Your Saliva Sample

    Ross Marchand on April 14, 2017

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    For the past decade, spitting saliva in a tube for DNA processing has been all the rage for viewers of the Maury television show, science geeks, hypochondriacs, and everyone in-between. Companies such as 23andMe have vigorously marketed their ability to use these genetic samples to identify customers’ ancestry and health risk. But the firm’s foray into health status prediction was too much for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), which finally went nuclear on 23andMe after several warnings.  In 2013, the FDA barred 23andMe from sharing health related conjecture tailored to customers’ genetic markers. For example, my own 23andMe report, which gave me risk percentages of developing major diseases relative to the population, was suddenly devoid of any such projections after the FDA’s actions. In justifying the ban, the administration reasoned that any disease probability estimate was inherently misleading, since the vast majority of genes playing a role in the development of the illnesses are not known. In the government’s view, 23andMe was assigning an unreasonably-high weight to a handful of genetic markers they’d analyzed.

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  • New Leadership At The FDA Is Just What the Doctor Ordered

    Michi Iljazi on April 3, 2017

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    This article appeared in IJ Review on March 27, 2017

    While there has been endless coverage of the changes taking place in the Executive Branch under the new Trump Administration, there are still some very critical posts and appointments that have received little or no coverage. For example, the nomination of Dr. Scott Gottlieb as the next Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) could have a lasting impact on innovation and health. Dr. Gottlieb is a scholar, a physician, and has prior experience at the agency - he also understands that the FDA impacts the lives of all Americans.

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  • Taxpayers Protection Alliance Reacts to President Trump’s Speech

    David Williams on February 28, 2017

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    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) has a mixed evaluation of President Donald Trump’s speech to Congress and the American people. With a national debt nearing $20 trillion, spending is out of control. TPA is disappointed that President Trump has called for more Defense spending. TPA is also disheartened that he did not address Washington’s runaway spending. Taxpayers should be encouraged that the President is committed to comprehensive tax and regulatory reform.

    Click "Read Blog" to see TPA's full reaction to the Trump Address. 

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  • President Trump Must Address Taxes, Spending, and Regulatory Reform in Address to Congress

    Ross Marchand on February 28, 2017

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    Tonight, President Trump will ascend to the lectern and articulate his policy vision to a joint session of Congress. Presidents have used past joint sessions to focus on a myriad of issues, from voting rights to foreign foes to economic policy. But as the new President makes his first address on Capitol Hill, the plight of the taxpayer could and should take the forefront.

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  • Time to Repeal Dick Durbin’s Corporate Giveaway

    David Williams on February 16, 2017

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    This article originally appeared in The Hill on February 13, 2017

    President Trump has made his disdain for the Dodd-Frank Act clear as day. In his first weeks in office, he even signed an executive order that said his administration will roll back the most punitive parts of the law. This week, a coalition of conservative organizations ranging from the R Street Institute to the Taxpayers Protection Alliance dispatched a letter to Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-Texas), the chairman of the House Financial Services Committee, urging repeal of the Durbin Amendment, a provision of the law that sets price controls on interchange fees for debit card purchases. If Congress wants to help “drain the swamp,” ending this corporate giveaway would be a great place to start.

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