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  • Here's How the World Cup Could Force Taxpayers to Fund Bureaucrats’ Pet Transit Projects in Houston

    Johnny Kampis on June 25, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in The Daily Caller on June 22, 2018.

    As Houston officials mull the possible flow of tax dollars into their city if they win a bid to host some games in the 2026 World Cup, they’re talking up that dreaded “L” word — light rail. Houston is part of a 32-city bid to host some of the soccer matches that will be spread across North America. While the city won’t know if it is selected to host any games until 2020 or 2021, that hasn’t stopped local officials from excitedly talking up possible taxpayer-funded infrastructure and beautification projects that could result from a successful bid.

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  • New Survey: It’s No Shock that Americans Are Opposed to Electric Car Subsidies

    Ross Marchand on June 22, 2018

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    Electric cars are one of the federal government’s favorite pet projects, with billions of dollars in various subsidies bestowed on producers, like Elon Musk, and high income buyers every single year. Increasingly, state and local governments have gotten on the subsidy bandwagon as well, offering lucrative production, purchase, parking, and charging benefits to everyone involved. Justifications ring a dime a dozen, ranging from miniscule impacts on global climate to thinly veiled protectionism. Too often, though, taxpayers and consumers are left out of the equation. Subsidies and “green” requirements, after all, inevitably trickle down to everyone else, resulting in higher prices and “accounts payable” to Uncle Sam and taxpayers.  » Read More
  • TPA Slams Supreme Court for Online Sales Tax Ruling

    David Williams on June 21, 2018

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    Today, Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) President David Williams expressed disappointment at the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling that allows states to require all internet retailers to collect sales taxes. “The 5-4 decision breaks with 50 years of precedent that kept states from mandating that out-of-state retailers collect sales taxes from their customers,” Williams said. “This ruling opens the door for any state to tax any business that simply wants to use the internet to gain a foothold in the national market.” » Read More
  • Anti-Online Gambling Coalition Grasps at Advertising Straws

    Johnny Kampis on June 21, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in the American Spectator on June 19, 2018.


    Having failed to get much traction on a federal prohibition of online gaming, casino magnate Sheldon Adelson and his coalition have pointed to targeted online ads promoting online gambling as proof that Congress should take action. But the measure is a desperate ploy, given that the ads aren’t intentionally placed on certain sites by the online casinos. Business Insider recently ran a story about the Coalition to Stop Online Gambling’s opposition to the ads. The coalition says it has found such ads on websites about gambling addiction or featuring children’s games.

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  • Congress has acted; now, states need to fix their tax codes, too

    Ross Marchand on June 20, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in the Washington Examiner on June 18, 2018.

    In the aftermath of the historic federal tax reform passed in December, it’s easy to declare “mission accomplished” and divert attention to other pressing issues. But the problem of bad tax policy has not gone away, it has merely shifted from D.C. to state capitals across the country. Case in point: Madison, Wis., where in April, Gov. Scott Walker signed into law a one-time tax payout for families in the state. The payments began going out in May, and will continue until early July.

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  • Discussion of Nationalized 5G Rises From the Dead

    Johnny Kampis on June 19, 2018

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  • ACCESS to Recordings Act Leaves Musical Trailblazers in the Dust

    Ross Marchand on June 18, 2018

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    Too often, trailblazing musical artists are robbed of their royalties – and their retirements – due to a long-abused quirk in intellectual property law. In particular, artists behind recordings made before February 15, 1972 have been the victims of some digital services’ questionable legal interpretations. In a welcome development, The Compensating Legacy Artists for their Songs, Service, Important Contributions to Society (CLASSICS) Act, included in the larger Music Modernization Act (MMA), remedies the problem by firming up federal language to give “oldie” artists like Darlene Love and Tony Bennett the same protections as their later peers. The MMA unanimously passed the House 415-0 in April and is now in the hands of the Senate Judiciary Committee. » Read More
  • Taxpayers Protection Alliance Launches World Cup Watchdog to Fight Soccer Cronyism

    David Williams on June 13, 2018

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    WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA) announced the World Cup Watchdog project to monitor taxpayer subsidies and privileges directed toward the World Cup.  The move comes as the 2026 World Cup was awarded to the United States, Canada, and Mexico this morning, setting the stage for billions of taxpayer dollars to be directed toward the major sporting event. » Read More
  • Reports of the Death of The Internet Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

    Ross Marchand on June 11, 2018

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    In 1897, after Mark Twain’s mistaken obituary was published, it was widely reported that Twain quipped to a reporter, “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.”  The poor, mistaken obituary writer hasn’t been the only one to make this sort of mistake. For months, supporters of Title II regulation of the internet have declared the untimely demise of the internet, with all fervor and no evidence. Now that Title II has officially been repealed (12:01 am on June 11, 2018), its time to set the record straight.  The Twainian truth is that Title II has all but been in the ash heap for seven months after the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) December 2017 ruling to rollback internet regulations. From the December 14 repeal date, internet service providers (ISPs) knew that, if they wanted to, they could favor and throttle data without fear of punishment from the FCC. » Read More
  • Starbucks’ “Open Access” Policy May Cost Taxpayers

    Ross Marchand on June 8, 2018


    This article originally appeared in Economics21 on June 7, 2018.

    For more than a decade, Starbucks has branded itself as a liberal company that MSNBC viewers can support. This careful posturing, though, was not enough to shield the company against accusations of racism after staff called the police on two African-American men sitting at a table without making a purchase. Since then, Starbucks announced that all were welcome to make use of company facilities such as bathrooms and Wi-Fi, even if no purchases are made. But what if, instead of a panicked PR response, Starbucks’ open-access policy is an opportunistic ploy to put itself in a league of its own and receive more taxpayer subsidies? 

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  • TPA Pushes for Rescissions Package

    David Williams on June 7, 2018

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    On June 7, 2018, TPA President David Williams wrote to Congress urging the passage of the Spending Cuts to Expired and Unnecessary Programs Act, H.R. 3. This would remove $15.4 billion in unnecessary funding to programs that, in previous years, have remained dormant in the budgeting process. You can find the full letter here.   » Read More
  • Congress Should Make Haste on Spectrum Auction Legislation

    Johnny Kampis on June 6, 2018

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    The AIRWAVES Act would create a pipeline of spectrum auctions for commercial use and help the U.S. lead the world in 5G development.  But, like any legislation, it should be done the right way to ensure that the sale of spectrum doesn't play favorites and that decisions on the use of spectrum be technology neutral.This legislation, from a bipartisan group of senators and congresspersons, intends to reallocate spectrum and encourage wireless deployment to underserved rural areas with its plan for a series of spectrum auctions beginning later this year.
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  • Larger Trucks Would Stick Taxpayers With Mile-Long Maintenance Bills

    Ross Marchand on June 5, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in the Daily Caller on May 31, 2018


    America’s highway infrastructure is in big trouble, with trillions of dollars in needed repairs across the nation’s roadways and thoroughfares. Elected officials at all levels of government have talked a big talk about this problem, with successive administrations and Congresses proposing grand plans to shore up crumbling roads and bridges. Unfortunately, when it comes to government, one hand often does not know what the other is doing.

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  • The Truth About the President’s Postal Policy

    Ross Marchand on June 4, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in the Morning Consult on May 31, 2018.


    Few federal agencies attract more of a media and policy circus than the United States Postal Service. After months of heaping Twitter “shade” on the USPS, President Donald Trump pushed Postmaster General Megan Brennan to raise Amazon’s shipping rates — to no avail. This pressure is the culmination of the president’s correct accusation that Amazon receives a hefty government subsidy due to USPS policy and lax congressional oversight. While the president’s claims are true, there exist far more effective measures to level the playing field for e-commerce players: By adapting simple, commonsense reforms, taxpayers and consumers can look forward to less red ink from flawed postal policy. And, maybe, a fiscally stable USPS. » Read More
  • Taxpayers Protection Alliance Criticizes President Trump’s Imposition of Tariffs on Steel and Aluminum Imports

    Ross Marchand on June 1, 2018

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    Today, David Williams, President of the Taxpayers Protection Alliance (TPA), slammed President Trump’s imposition of tariffs on steel and aluminum imports to the United States. Williams argued that, “if the US government hides behind trade barriers and quotas in a global marketplace, it will start a trade war where allies will treat U.S. products in the same manner. Already, Canada, Mexico, and various European countries have announced retaliatory tariffs that will harm US producers." » Read More
  • Instead of subsidized transit, lawmakers should look to private rail

    Ross Marchand on May 31, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in the Washington Examiner on May 29, 2018.

    In December, an inaugural Amtrak trip from Seattle to Portland ended in disaster, as thirteen train cars derailed and caused a smoldering ruin over I-5. Amtrak is hardly the only passenger rail vessel to encounter safety issues; the Washington, D.C. metro system has had multiple fires and crashes costing many lives over the years. These events almost always lead to calls for more public funds, even when subsidized systems have a myriad of ways to access cash. For instance, the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority recently benefited from private funds from Qatar to stay open after a sporting event in downtown Washington, D.C. But taxpayers would be wise to look to another model of doing things. 

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  • Medicare Part D Reforms Needed to Keep Costs Low for Taxpayers and Seniors

    Ross Marchand on May 30, 2018

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    When paying for healthcare, American seniors often have a difficult time navigating through the benefit structures and limitations of Medicare. While Medicare Part D registers astronomical approval ratings from seniors, there is a large cost problem. Drugs accessible to seniors face rampant cost escalation, forcing individuals on a fixed income to make difficult choices in financing their medical needs.  And, taxpayers pay the increased costs through public health plans. Attempted reforms to save seniors and taxpayers from unintended costs have proven futile  and must be reversed to bring sanity back to the system. » Read More
  • New NAFTA Needs Intellectual Property Protections

    Ross Marchand on May 29, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in Economics21 on May 23, 2018

    The North American Free Trade Agreement may soon be in for an update, as the United States, Mexico, and Canada seek to revise the treaty. One important area needing more attention from negotiators is intellectual property (IP) protection for companies doing business up and down the continent.
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  • Title II Internet Regulations Will Throw Granny Over The Digital Cliff

    Ross Marchand on May 25, 2018

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    This article originally appeared in the Daily Caller on May 23, 2018. 

    Over the past decade, regulators and politicians have played a Jekyll and Hyde game with regulating the internet. Under the Obama Administration, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler shadily imposedstringent regulations on the internet. Internet service providers (ISPs), for instance, were barred from offering customers “zero-rated” (free data) plans that exempted certain applications from data caps under Wheeler. But, the interwebs breathed a sigh of relief last December when new FCC Chairman Ajit Pai unshackled the internet from unnecessary rules. » Read More
  • President Trump’s Healthcare Plan is Already Bringing Down Drug Prices

    David Williams on May 23, 2018

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    President Trump’s focus on drug prices is already paying off. Almost immediately following the President’s speech on drug pricing, pharmaceutical manufacturer Amgen announced that their new treatment for migraines will cost 30 percent less than analysts anticipated.  This is good news for patients and taxpayers who foot the bill for these medications via government healthcare plans. » Read More
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